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EBN: Summer School for Buyers: HDI & Auto Design

Summer School for Buyers: HDI & Auto Design

Today’s automotive industry is changing at an incredibly fast pace, moving from combustion engine-based designs with human drivers to driverless, electronics-based systems. This automotive transformation presents some clear electronic design challenges in the inevitable shift toward the design and production of semi- and fully autonomous vehicles.

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Financial Times: Can Automakers Catch Up with Google in Driverless Cars?

Can Automakers Catch Up with Google in Driverless Cars?

General Motors celebrated being the world’s largest carmaker for the 76th straight year in 2007. It was sitting on $25 billion in cash. Eighteen months later, it was bankrupt. The automotive industry is among the most capital intensive in the world: If the economy sours, assets turn into liabilities overnight as factories churning out thousands of cars begin to hemorrhage cash. So when toxic mortgage securities blew up in 2008, causing a recession, banks performed terribly — but carmakers fared even worse. (Article originally appeared in Financial Times)

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EDN: Meeting the power demands of battery supplied automotive electronics

Meeting the power demands of battery supplied automotive electronics

Have you driven a new automobile recently?  It can be an almost futuristic experience, with sophisticated gauges, touch screens, connected entertainment systems, and lighting—all of which need power. Behind all these electronics are battery regulators and battery chargers that manage the power both into and out of 12V, 24V, and 48V batteries. Each year the ‘must have’ list of supported accessories and electronic systems grows with the expectation that the size, weight and number of supporting power components will keep pace with the increased power demands.

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EBN: Cross-Organizational Data Sharing in the Auto Supply Chain Reduces Defects

Cross-Organizational Data Sharing in the Auto Supply Chain Reduces Defects

For years, semiconductor manufacturers have leveraged manufacturing data throughout their globally-dispersed supply chains to improve quality and reduce return material authorizations (RMAs). Automotive OEMs and Tier 1 suppliers are now working to meet the similar challenge of reducing defective parts per million (DPPM) and beyond in vehicle production. The ability to share and connect data backwards and forwards throughout the supply chain is now seen as a key capability to address this challenge. How can sharing data throughout the automotive supply chain reduce DPPM?