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EBN: Summer School for Buyers: HDI & Auto Design

Summer School for Buyers: HDI & Auto Design

Today’s automotive industry is changing at an incredibly fast pace, moving from combustion engine-based designs with human drivers to driverless, electronics-based systems. This automotive transformation presents some clear electronic design challenges in the inevitable shift toward the design and production of semi- and fully autonomous vehicles.

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Financial Times: Can Automakers Catch Up with Google in Driverless Cars?

Can Automakers Catch Up with Google in Driverless Cars?

General Motors celebrated being the world’s largest carmaker for the 76th straight year in 2007. It was sitting on $25 billion in cash. Eighteen months later, it was bankrupt. The automotive industry is among the most capital intensive in the world: If the economy sours, assets turn into liabilities overnight as factories churning out thousands of cars begin to hemorrhage cash. So when toxic mortgage securities blew up in 2008, causing a recession, banks performed terribly — but carmakers fared even worse. (Article originally appeared in Financial Times)

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MotorTrend: 2018 CES Tech: Six Budget LIDAR Systems

2018 CES TECH: Six Budget LIDAR Systems

Autonomy requires gobs of sensors, and although Elon Musk and Tesla have publicly said "no thanks" to laser-based lidar sensing in favor of cameras, most of the rest of the industry expects to augment cameras with this "light detection and ranging" technology. For the past few years, the race has been on to replace those spendy spinny laser scanners festooning the roofs of the current crop of robo-taxis and autonomous prototype test vehicles with cheaper, smaller, lighter designs that are easier to integrate into the bodywork. At CES, plenty of options were found featuring lasers that still move, mirrors that move, and completely solid-state flash lidar concepts. 

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MSN Money: Foresight's Doron Cohadier

Foresight's Doron Cohadier

Video: One of the men behind the future of driving on what's next.

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CNBC: What Driving Will Look Like in the Year 2028

What Driving Will Look Like in the Year 2028

A company called Foresight, which listed on the Nasdaq in the spring of 2017 has seen its shares jump and drop since going public. But in the last month the stock has seen a dramatic turn around, rising 35 percent in the month before the signature electronics show on the Vegas strip. Israel based Foresight gave CNBC a test drive, to demonstrate what it's like behind the wheel.